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[PUBLICATION] Adherence to mental health care and caregiver-patient relationship after diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures

Adherence to mental health care and caregiver-patient relationship after diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures
Adherence to mental health care and caregiver-patient relationship after diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures
Dates

on the August 19, 2020

Published in Seizure

Collaborative research project led by Dr. Coraline Hingray

Adherence to mental health care and caregiver-patient relationship after diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: Longitudinal follow-up study

Abstract

Purpose: This study aimed to describe the quality of adherence to mental health care follow-up and the mental health caregiver-patient relationship after diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES).

Methods: We conducted an ancillary study of a multicenter prospective study. Patients (n = 108) received a standardized diagnostic explanation of PNES following video-EEG. They were referred to their community mental health centers or to a private psychiatrist/psychologist, who received written information about PNES and the study. Data collected about adherence to care (follow-up started or not, consensual and those who withdrew non-consensually, ongoing follow-up) were cross-tabulated from patients and care structures by telephone at 6, 12, 18 and 24 months after diagnosis. At M24, we collected reasons for stopping follow-up by phone using a predefined 9-item questionnaire. We also assessed the perception of the caregiver-patient relationship among patients who started follow-up and their mental health caregivers with a simple questionnaire based on five dimensions: feeling comfortable, continuity of care, content of therapy sessions, effectiveness of therapy sessions, and the patient's overall assessment of the follow-up.

Results: From M6 to M24, ongoing follow-up decreased from 64.8 to 25.8%, while the "not following initial recommandations" group of patients (those who never started follow-up and those who withdrew non-consensually) increased from 35.2 to 64.9%. We found two main reasons for stopping follow-up: lack of interest and feeling better. Adherent patients had an overall more positive view of their therapy than caregivers.

Conclusion: Only a third of PNES patients adhered to a mental health care program and felt comfortable in the caregiver-patient relationship. Solutions need to be found to help patients understand the interest of follow-up therapy and help mental health caregivers improve their feeling of competence.

Keywords

Adherence to care; Caregiver-patient relationship; Functional neurological symptom disorder; Mental health caregivers; PNES; Psychotherapy; Treatment.

Copyright © 2020 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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